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Author Topic: First Time Wiring Juniper (Procumbens Nana)  (Read 1612 times)
rmcninch108
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« on: January 17, 2015, 02:03 PM »

Hello, I am just starting out in the Bonsai craft and would like advice on how to start out with this tree. I purchased from a local garden center and after doing some reading found this to be a "Mallsai" . The moss and rocks were glued on the surface.I don't think it was the right time to repot but thought it better to get it out of the situation it was in. I purchased Bonsai soil (Conifer Blend) and repotted. My question is what is the best way to start wiring to get the shape i want. Right now the trunk comes up about an inch and then sweeps horizontally . I would like it to come up higher vertical and then have branches horizontal. I will attach photos that I hope will help. Please forgive if this was not placed in correct category. Thanks,Robert
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LarryT
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« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2015, 05:18 PM »

The thin trunk of seedling junipers will not thicken much once they are out of the ground (in a shallow pot).  So, to keep things in scale, the height of the plant will need to be kept short (@6 inches) if it is to give the miniature impression of a tree.  Tiny bonsai often have to be more impressionistic rather than exacting in branch placement. If you are aiming for the look of a cute evergreen shrub in a pot, it could be allowed to grow up and out more, about like it is.  To thicken the trunk and then develop a medium size bonsai, juniper seedlings/saplings will need to be growing back in the ground for 5 or ten more years (and likely with occasional root pruning to avoid leggy roots).  Or just buy one which the landscape nursery or bonsai nursery allowed to grow larger prior to digging and selling.  Find pictures of a juniper bonsai you like, and then compare the thickness of the trunk to the height of the tree.   After your recent root work, do not put it outside until danger of freezing is gone, but then a juniper needs to be outside constantly except for the occasional showing.  Your juniper does look green and healthy in the pictures, have fun, welcome to bonsai. 
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rmcninch108
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« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2015, 06:05 AM »

Thanks for your advice,Robert
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Adair M
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« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2015, 07:50 AM »

This tree needs full sun to live. I would put it outside, but if the weather is going to go below freezing, bring it into the garage. Then put it back out. That's because you repotted. Next winter, just leave it outside 24/7.
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Adair M
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« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2015, 08:01 AM »

Now, you asked about wiring...

This is the right season for it, but what this tree needs is a bit of thinning and pruning to find the "structure" within that ball of foliage. Once found, then wire for shape.

Something like that is best "demonstrated" in person rather than "described" in words. Do you know an experienced bonsai person?  (And the place where you bought this is disqualified!)
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rmcninch108
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« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2015, 08:30 AM »

I do not know anyone now. The best I could do is watch "you tube "demo's. Chasnsx (Charles M) has some good ones.
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Adair M
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« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2015, 11:37 PM »

Uh, no he doesn't.

I'm not going to say that everything he does is wrong, but a large portion of it is, and even the stuff he does "right" is done poorly.

I'm going to suggest that if you don't know anyone, to go to Boon's site (www.bonsaiboon.com) and buy one of his DVD series on the kind of tree you are interested in.

Yes, it will cost you a little money. But, watch Boon work a tree, then go back and watch CharlesX. It's like comparing a highly skilled surgeon vs Jack the Ripper.
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rmcninch108
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« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2015, 05:44 AM »

Thanks for the information. I will check out website.Robert
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