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Author Topic: Japanese Black Pine Approach Graft  (Read 13146 times)
MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
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« on: February 27, 2011, 08:19 PM »

Another grafting technique Peter Tea demonstrated to the study group while he visited was approach grafting on a Japanese Black Pine.  A new apex, first, and second branch were grafted to make a much shorter tree.  More grafts were practiced by the group further up the trunk.  I'll report on the progress of this tree in another thread later this year.  More grafts will likely be needed in the future to improve the tree.

- Peter sizes up the first graft while Tim watches
- Aligning the first cut using a sharp saw
- The first cut is made with the saw
- Once the saw cut is made Peter cleans up and widens the cut with a sharp grafting knife
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MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2011, 08:22 PM »

- The first graft is tied in place
- A second graft is done above the first
- The branch is sliced a little on the top and bottom and fitted into the slot
- Note how close the fit is

Peter mentioned that if the cut happens to be a little to big, it's more important for the bottom layers to match.  If needed, fit a peg in the top gap to ensure that the lower surfaces have mated properly.

Again, if you're going to graft, don't repot.  If you're going to repot, don't graft.
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bwaynef
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« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2011, 08:55 AM »

- The first graft is tied in place
...
- The branch is sliced a little on the top and bottom and fitted into the slot

Were the scions cut before they were insert into the channel?
What exactly was sliced off the top & bottom?
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MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
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« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2011, 09:10 AM »

Wayne,

Yes, the scion was cut, essentially making it flat on top and bottom.  Enough material was removed to expose the cambium so the graft would take.  I wasn't able to find a picture of this, so one must not have been taken.

Also, don't decandle the grafted branch this year.  We want growth to thicken the branch and fill the cut, to ensure the graft will take.
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mcpesq817
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« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2011, 11:07 AM »

Thanks very much for posting this - this is really helpful.  Last fall I bought a JBP from my local nursery in the sale pile that was about 6 feet tall, with a 6 inch base and good movement that I'll need to graft branches lower down on the trunk beginning in 2012.  These pictures are great to show how it's done.
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jow
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« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2011, 08:33 PM »

Some great pics explaining the process.

I came across this article after writing a short piece on my blog. I saw this technique used a lot in Japan particularly on Junipers. Its a really handy skill to perfect.
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MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
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« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2011, 04:25 PM »

Good candle growth on the 3 main ones I'm interested in.  The grafts on the upper section of the tree will likely be discarded, with the entire upper half of the tree.  Plans are to rebuild a much smaller tree.

Candles are in the 6-8" range at this point.
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BONSAI_OUTLAW
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« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2011, 08:41 PM »

Another great thread Matsu.   

When will cut the approach graft?  When will you candle it?
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MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
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« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2011, 06:52 PM »

Jase,

The grafts will not be decandled this year.  I'm looking for big strong growth the heal the graft unions quickly.  I'm hoping they put on a lot of wood this year as a result.  If all goes well the donor branches could be severed as early as next year, but will likely stay an additional year.  Another graft will be needed next year for a back branch, as well.
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Chrisl
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« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2011, 10:19 AM »

Thanks for redirecting me to this approach graft thread John.  So this is a safer/more consistent way of doing grafts I assume?  And one other thing, it must be tricky finding the exact spot on the trunk to do this so the new shoot is coming out at the right spot, and the right angle. 
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MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
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« Reply #10 on: July 26, 2011, 10:25 AM »

It's just one technique in a bag of tricks.  Sometimes it is appropriate, sometimes other methods would be more ideal.
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Chrisl
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« Reply #11 on: July 26, 2011, 10:27 AM »

I see.  Boy do I have quite a bit of learning ahead of me Cheesy  Thanks John.
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Alain Bertrand
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« Reply #12 on: July 27, 2011, 02:23 AM »

Actually, I screw my scion to the trunk. My intent is to be really sure that it doesn't move at all and that the trauma caused by the screw will cause cell proliferation thus promoting faster healing.
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Dirk
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« Reply #13 on: August 08, 2011, 05:27 AM »

John,

Thanks for sharing the above!
You use the trees own branches for this approach grafting.

I have a JBP with missing branches, but no branches long enough to use.
Is it possible to approach graft with scions from another tree?
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MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
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« Reply #14 on: August 08, 2011, 07:28 AM »

Yes, but I wouldn't recommend it, unless you are replacing all of the foliage.  The growth characteristics will be different, and possibly quite noticeable.  I would suggest growing branches out for this purpose.  You could also bud graft, or try using parafilm.
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