Author Topic: Grafting using Parafilm  (Read 13880 times)

MatsuBonsai

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Grafting using Parafilm
« on: February 23, 2011, 08:07 PM »
Peter Tea was in this past weekend for our local study group.  One of the things covered was grafting.  Peter said the method I have been using, with the little baggies, is old school.  He was kind enough to share with us the grafting technique using the 1" Parafilm grafting tape.

One of the benefits of using the Parafilm method over the baggies is that you needn't worry about shielding the scion from the sun.  Also, there's not need to worry about when to cut the bag and acclimate the graft to a less humid environment.

Take the scion as usual, either from the same plant for a new branch, or from another more desirable cultivar to replace foliage entirely.  Cut off some of the unnecessary needles.  Stretch the tape end a little, then begin to wrap the scion near the base.  Be sure to leave enough room to make the wedge cut at the base.  Wrap all the way to the end of the needles and twist the end.

Cut the offset "V", long side will be against the branch/trunk for maximum contact.  Cut the long side first, then turn the scion 180° and make the second cut.  If you've made the second cut at 180° you will notice that the end is perfectly straight.
 
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MatsuBonsai

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Re: Grafting using Parafilm
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2011, 08:07 PM »
Next, make the cut into the understock/branch/trunk, mimicking the same angle and length of the long side "V".  For younger material (like our example here) you can cut deep into the stock as it will grow and heal quickly.

Note that the cut is nice and low, right on top of the roots. 

Now, insert the scion into the cut, trying your best to align the cambium layers.  Be sure you insert all the way deep into the cut, nice and snug.
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Grafting using Parafilm
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2011, 08:08 PM »
Peter said that you can use another section of Parafilm, but hasn't done this yet.  Here he uses strong plastic grafting tape that doesn't stretch very easily.

Begin at the back and wrap around the understock, pulling snug at the back so as not to dislodge the scion.

Wrap several times, then finally tie a knot.

Peter takes an extra step and seals the tape with some of the liquid cut paste.  When the scion begins to grow the new bud will extend out through the Parafilm.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Grafting using Parafilm
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2011, 10:29 AM »
Wow.  That looks a lot less maintenance-intensive than the little baggies.  What's the aftercare like?  At what point do you unwrap the "joint"?

It doesn't look it, but I guess the parafilm allows enough sunlight in to the scion?

Another question I always seem to have:  how do you get branches at the correct angle off the trunk when you're grafting them in (usually pointing upwards)?
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Grafting using Parafilm
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2011, 10:54 AM »
Wayne,

The Parafilm is wrapped so that it overlaps more than 50%, providing adequate shade, but allowing in some sunlight.  It will start to rot(?) away, but you can help it by September if it hasn't fallen away enough.  Just keep an eye on it.  I usually leave the tape on for a year with the baggie technique, and I imagine this will likely be the same.

Grafting secondary branches on main branches requires that you attach the scion to the side of the branch, in the direction you want the new growth.  For attaching scions to a larger trunk you can make the cut with a sharp chisel in the direction you want the new growth.  Michael Hagedorn has a good post on this on his blog.

By the way, Peter reports that this technique works on a variety of trees, especially pines and junipers.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2011, 11:14 AM by MatsuBonsai »
 

MatsuBonsai

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Re: Grafting using Parafilm
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2011, 11:05 AM »
Also, if you're going to graft, don't repot.  If you're going to repot, don't graft.  These little seedlings were just slipped out of the pot to make room for the knife.
 

meushi

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Re: Grafting using Parafilm
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2011, 02:03 PM »
A friend uses pallet stretch wrap film for all his grafting... it is very cheap, very strong and it does really cling back to itself.
 

bwaynef

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Re: Grafting using Parafilm
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2011, 02:27 PM »
A friend uses pallet stretch wrap film for all his grafting... it is very cheap, very strong and it does really cling back to itself.

I'd worry those qualities might be troublesome when removing it after the scion "takes".
 

shimsuki

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Re: Grafting using Parafilm
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2011, 05:26 PM »
Wow, great thread. I need to bookmark this for future reference.
 

avrilayse

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Re: Grafting using Parafilm
« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2011, 03:08 PM »
seems to be a very laborious task ..
 

bwaynef

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Re: Grafting using Parafilm
« Reply #10 on: June 19, 2011, 07:51 PM »
4 out of the 5 grafts I attempted earlier this spring seem to still be kicking.  Here's hoping.
 

Larry Gockley

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Re: Grafting using Parafilm
« Reply #11 on: June 20, 2011, 11:57 AM »
Maybe I missed something, but where can we get this parafilm tape? Larry
 

plantmanky

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Re: Grafting using Parafilm
« Reply #12 on: June 20, 2011, 12:44 PM »
You can use the same technique with waxed flora tape that is avliable at any hobby store.  I've used it for years and it works just fine and will sluff off the graft after a few months.  I usually cover the graft location with simple candle wax to prevent drying out and it will also sluff off.  There are many ways to skin the same cat! lol

RAndy
 

LarryT

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Re: Grafting using Parafilm
« Reply #13 on: June 21, 2011, 12:01 AM »
My understanding is that parafilm is used by hospitals, paramedics, etc. to cover some wounds.   Also, that it degrades, falls off eventually about when it would need to be removed.  Ask a nurse.  A man in the Iowa club has been using it for at least a year to wrap cuts in large limb bending, and maybe even over the whole limb after rafia and wire.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2011, 12:08 AM by LarryT »
 

Owen Reich

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Re: Grafting using Parafilm
« Reply #14 on: June 21, 2011, 07:34 AM »
You can get Parafilm at lab supply stores in person or on the Internet supply sites.  I bought my last roll on EBay.  Works great on Japanese maples, taxodium, and pecans from my experience.  I use grafting rubber bands and cover with grafting wax for apples and pears, but that was due to the nursery's preference I was helping.  Parafilm is great stuff!  Also works well if you crack a branch to protect it as it heals.