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Author Topic: Grafting Mugo Pine  (Read 2583 times)
Dirk
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« on: June 12, 2013, 03:33 PM »

Hi All,

Who of our forum members has experience with grafting on Mugo Pine.'
Recently I dug a great tree from a garden.
The twist in the trunk is awesome; but all the foliage is far away from it.

Anyone has thoughts about this?

I considered a few things:
Bending branches back to the trunk. Might be possible but I'm afraid of creating a ugly 'loop' when bending the topbranche back.

I also thought of approach grafting it's own branches on the trunk.
Bud grafting might be another possibility, maybe even bud grafting with another species?

I'd really like to hear your thoughts
(Though it's not yet relevant, it's a only a good month in my garden now)

Greets
Dirk
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augustine
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« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2013, 08:08 AM »

There are many examples on the web where trees are collected with foliage too far from the trunk. Problem is solved in the short run by bending.

Best,
Augustine
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bwaynef
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USDA Hardiness: 8a



« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2013, 08:45 AM »

I have no experiencing grafting Mugo ..but just wanted to give you something else to consider.

Where this tree is situated, it looks like you can give it all the sun it might want.  Ideally, you can provide for its water needs as well, ...especially if its in a free-draining soil.  Why not fertilize it heavily and see if you can get buds to pop all over?  I'd expect you'd be able to get pretty good backbudding during the time it takes for this tree to recover from collection.

Good luck in your efforts, whatever you decide.  Keep us posted!  (That's code for "take lots of pictures!")
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Dirk
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« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2013, 03:35 PM »

Wayne,

It's funny, but I didn't consider the possibility of getting it to back bud yet.
Of course you're right, but to get it to back bud I would have to prune?

That I don't want to do just now as it needs all the foliage to build a root system again?
So also pruning the new shoots after they harden of is out of the question??

This stuff is really confusing Angry

But yes, the tree is in course pumice, lava and some akadama.
I'm feeding it with organic fertilizer grains and fish emulsion every two weeks.


So it must be doing all right.

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MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
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« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2013, 03:44 PM »

...
Of course you're right, but to get it to back bud I would have to prune?
...

No.  To get a tree to back bud you feed aggressively and let grow freely.
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J

0soyoung
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« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2013, 03:51 PM »


No.  To get a tree to back bud you feed aggressively and let grow freely.

And then you cut it.


Removing most (not necessarily all) new growth after it has hardened is what really makes back buds.
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Dirk
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« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2013, 11:22 PM »

That is what I heard Ryan Neil say in his lecture kn pines earlier this year. Cut back new growth on sjngle flush pines after it hardens of to promote back budding. This wil be negative for the development of the roots?

I said this was confusing (me).
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0soyoung
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« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2013, 12:56 AM »

With any and every specie of tree, back budding is induced by cutting back the season's new growth after it has hardened (meaning new leaves are like old ones instead of being soft, fleshy, and lightly colored). The tree, and its roots in particular, should have had a significant part of the season to have grown before you do this, if you want a robustly growing tree. Typically the season's new growth on a pine is cut back in Oct/Nov (temperate zones of the northern hemisphere).

It is that simple, but can easily made more complicated - fascinating things, plants, but especially trees.

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MatsuBonsai
John Callaway
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« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2013, 07:44 AM »

Yes, the science says that if you remove the terminal growth the auxin that inhibits latent buds will be removed.  Blindly repeating the last line of a recipe doesn't make for a good cake.  I much prefer to begin with the first line of the recipe, start with a healthy tree (feed aggressively).

Let's explore the practice as it relates to bonsai and to pines in general.

Removing growth from a weak and/or newly collected tree you will merely weaken it further.  However, aggressively feeding pine trees will produce enough energy that latent buds will be activated. 

What happens if the new buds that formed were too weak, or appeared in the wrong places?   Oh crap, you removed all the candles so I guess bud grafting is out.  All the leggy branches are now weak and when you try to bend them back on themselves to approach graft they snap.  Not only that, but you slowed them down significantly so for the ones you are able to bend thickening will be slowed, and therefore the success rate is much lower.

On top of all that, this tree is recently collected.  Let the tree recover.  Let this years growth develop to produce and feed new roots.

If you want to graft, do so next year.
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J

bwaynef
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« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2013, 08:05 AM »

On top of all that, this tree is recently collected.  Let the tree recover.  Let this years growth develop to produce and feed new roots.

+1 to everything this guy said, but especially this!
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Dirk
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« Reply #10 on: June 14, 2013, 02:54 PM »

Thanks John,

Seems like everyone is saying the same but in a different way.
For the remainder of the year I'll be feeding and watering it.
Next year, if it grows well I'll go and work on back budding by pruning back new growth.

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John Kirby
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« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2013, 09:31 PM »

Sung to the tune of an old song:

"Let it grow, let it grow, let it grow."

Some things just need a little time to work best, and to reduce risk.
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Dirk
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« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2013, 04:03 PM »

Can't really stand the tune to those lyrics after last winter and spring..... Cheesy
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Gaffer
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« Reply #13 on: July 17, 2013, 10:49 AM »

I would approach graft if possible. If your branches are breaking try wiring them down to the point of graft. I have done a few mugos like that  but they were still in the ground. Left for 2years and all worked.  Maybe plant back into ground and then approach graft. Should work. Make sure tree is very healthy. Good luck.
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Dirk
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« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2013, 01:52 PM »

Thanks Gaffer,

The tree is growing well though new needles will not be as long as the old needles.
This winter I'll wire some branches in place for approachgrafts next spring.

Micheal Hagedorn has a ponderosa grafted with JBP. Ten years after grafting already a great tree.  I have that tree as an example for my tree.

Dirk
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