Author Topic: Old boxwoods  (Read 7870 times)

Charlestonbonsai

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Old boxwoods
« on: October 14, 2013, 09:14 PM »
I found some old boxwoods that I can take, which have 4 inch trunks that are short and have great nebari, so I want them to do well, but the book I read suggests building wooden pots to put them in after collection, which is a lot of work. Is this necessary?
 

hometeamrocker

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Re: Old boxwoods
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2013, 10:02 PM »
I collected 3 in March with 4" trunks and potted them in boxes made from 2x4s and they are doing great. FWIW...
 

Jay

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Re: Old boxwoods
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2013, 06:30 AM »
Yes, building a box is work. But... You are collecting a boxwood that has been in the ground for many years. You will be cutting away some of the roots...possibly more than you should. The grow box will be a recovery location for the tree. It will live there for a few years and hopefully grow new feeder roots near the trunk. Then you can gradually move it to smaller and smaller containers.
Bonsai is extremely rewarding. It is NOT quick or necessarily easy, and yes at times it is a lot of work.

Where do you live? Can you find and join a Bonsai club. There you will meet local people who might just help you.
Just my two cents
Good luck and post some pictures
Jay
 

Charlestonbonsai

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Re: Old boxwoods
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2013, 01:14 PM »
I would assume that the boxes need to be made from un-treated wood, but can they be plywood? On this website I heard someone mention a bonsai society in Summerville, which is near me, and I will look into that.

 

Jay

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Re: Old boxwoods
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2013, 03:08 PM »
This box is for a couple of years. Should not be pressure treated and only needs to be as good looking as you need it to be. Remember, do you need to bring it in for the winter? It will need lift points or handles and a strong enough bottom so it doesn't fall apart. Also you will need to secure the tree to the box. I prefer not to use plywood but I guess it could work. Make it just big enough because you have to fill it with soil.
That all said I am in northern Vermont. My growing needs are way different than yours. Check out that club and join... You will not regret it, nor will your trees.
Jay
 

michaelj

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Re: Old boxwoods
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2013, 03:42 PM »
I'd just put them in 5 gallon pots or, if the nebari is too wide, 14" plastic pots.
 

Jay

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Re: Old boxwoods
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2013, 04:59 PM »
Well, 5 gallon pots are probably not going to be wide enough. Your are trying to spread out the roots as much as you can and plant shallow. Even if it would fit in a 5 gallon pot it would promote deeper growing roots.
Jay
 

bwaynef

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Re: Old boxwoods
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2013, 08:06 PM »
I'm sure there's someone knowledgable in the area.  I went to Summerville to spend time with Ron Martin about 7 years ago.  Its my understanding that he was a driving force in the Summerville club/group, but he passed (too early) a few years ago.

The reason constructed boxes are recommended is that these collected trees need to be stable and will be in the same location for (potentially) several years, recovering from collection.  Having a sturdy purpose-made box (not TOO big; its been recommended to put them in the smallest container that'll hold the rootball post-collection) allows us to do that.

If you need a hand (and we can work things out) let me know,
 

michaelj

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Re: Old boxwoods
« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2013, 11:47 PM »
I have collected close to 100 boxwoods (taking 15 more this weekend) in the past couple of years without putting any in grow boxes, and only managed to kill one. Six or seven weeks ago, I collected 25 boxwoods with trunks ranging from about 2" to 4". I put some in 5 gallon pots and others (the ones with the widest nebari or multiple trunks) in 14" plastic pots that are maybe 6" or 8" deep. Coming into mid-October, 24 of the 25 have been thriving, and the one that is not had been torn out before I got there, left out without water for a week, and had only about a 6" root ball. If they are regular Japanese or American boxwoods, I wouldn't worry about putting them in growboxes for a long time. Just nothing extremely shallow. I'm less sure about Kingsville, but if they have 4" trunks, I'm guessing they are not Kingsville.

I'm in Zone 10, which affords me a little more leeway, especially this late in the season, but even in Zone 8, these things should do fine in pots.

This is the kind of pot I put most of mine in. They cost me about $3 apiece at the local farm supply.

http://lexicon.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341c9d1e53ef019aff88f271970c-pi
 

hometeamrocker

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Re: Old boxwoods
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2013, 03:07 AM »
What are the forum's reservations about pressure treated wood? I've had 5 4" trunk boxwoods in boxes made from pressure treated wood for 2 years and they are all doing great. Something I should know?
 

John Kirby

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Re: Old boxwoods
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2013, 05:40 AM »
I use treated lumber for my boxes. ButI tend to make them larger. Any pot can work fine if it has the room to hold the roots and enough new medium fir the roots to grow. The final caveat is that you need to be able to tie the trees in.having the tree secured in the pot prevents those whoopsies from happening down the road.

Personally, I prefer boxes for stability, especially when the trees grow strong and get a large mass of foliage.
 

donmaple

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Re: Old boxwoods
« Reply #11 on: January 07, 2014, 12:03 PM »
Charleston, I am a member of the Summerville Bonsai Group. We have a small group of faithful Bonsai-ists. Would love to have one more. I know this reply is late, but we may have some containers if you are still in need. To reply to the matter of pressure treated wood, years ago the process used  a copper-cianide agent, nasty poison. But it found leaching into the ground at childrens playgrounds, so the EPA pushed to change the agent, now a copper-silica agent is used. Now that being said, I,have no clue as to the effects of copper silica on trees. I have used treated limber to build Bonsai boxes and have not lost a tree or seen any slowing of growth. Respectfully, Don.
 

Gaffer

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Re: Old boxwoods
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2014, 08:29 PM »
You can use big plastic bags, just make sure you punch allot of holes in the bottom . Use black plastic garbage bags. And keep them out of the hot sun in summer.
Qualicum Brian