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Ohio Buckeye Cutting

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Vulcan:
A question to consider is whether or not there are size and species limitations to successful rooting off a cutting. Case in point is a Ohio Buckeye (Aesculus glabra) which was taken off a cut down tree. I had no plan to actually attempt this, yet while clearing around said tree I cut off the suckers and removed this stub. Asked if it could still grow roots as it was cut flush with a saw, I simply didn't know, so I thought I'd try.

Here are 3 pics to date after 2weeks. The growth may well be a last gasp, but who knows. The only way I could see its survival was to set it directly in water; I know I've seen this done with some tropical and/or subtropical species, but I have no idea as to whether this would work on a deciduous species in a temperate climate.

[edit: offsite images removed]

If any of you good people tried something similar, or any thoughts as to success or not please let me know. Like I said, this was a drop of the hat experiment.

John

Jim Doiron:
I don't know much about buckeyes so I have now idea if this will work or not. If I had to guess I would think no. This would work for some species like willow or forsythia that root really easily but even for those wet sand is a better option because you get the moisture needed with some air as well to prevent rot. You are probably right that the growth is just from nutrients already in the stump because it certainly isn't getting nutrients from the water.  I would get it into a sand pile or pot of sand to give it better odds.  Good luck.

Vulcan:
Thanks for the reply Jim. It's a crapshoot since I don't know how quickly this type roots either. Using sand crossed my mind, but I just don't know how well this thing will take up the moisture.

Owen Reich:
It may work.  Never tried buckeye, but those can grow in wet, mucky soil if I remember correctly.  I'd put it in some sort of media like 50/50 peat moss to perlite and water often. Reason being roots grown in water will not transfer well to container culture.

Dave Murphy:
I have nothing to add to the conversation other then to say that I once cut down a small tree of unknown species in October, 20' tall with an 8" diam trunk, sectioned the trunk into 2' pieces and threw it on the wood pile...in April of the following year, adventitious buds popped on many of the logs and pushed 6" before the energy in the trunk was exhausted.

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