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Collecting pine growing in red clay

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bwaynef:
I just happened across a handful of pines growing in red clay.  One particular one has about a 5" trunk, but looks fairly young.  There is excellent movement, and a handful of low branches.  (The other trees either have little movement or are smaller.)

1.) What are the chances of a pine having a decent root mass in red clay.
2.) Would it need to be bare-rooted before repotting?
3.) What is a recommended soil mix for this situation?
4.) What are you doing this Saturday? :)

Pictures tomorrow ...or the first workday thereafter that its not raining.

bonsaikc:

--- Quote from: bwaynef on January 20, 2010, 01:34 PM ---I just happened across a handful of pines growing in red clay.  One particular one has about a 5" trunk, but looks fairly young.  There is excellent movement, and a handful of low branches.  (The other trees either have little movement or are smaller.)

1.) What are the chances of a pine having a decent root mass in red clay.
2.) Would it need to be bare-rooted before repotting?
3.) What is a recommended soil mix for this situation?
4.) What are you doing this Saturday? :)

Pictures tomorrow ...or the first workday thereafter that its not raining.

--- End quote ---

I'd guess perhaps a little better than one growing in loam, but I've made the mistake of not following roots out to their end and just cutting them off, so make sure you get enough. You can develop a good root mass over time if you get enough feeder roots at the beginning. I would NOT bare-root, except for half of the root ball. Do the next half next repot. Boon mix is always recommended. As usual, I will be grinding it out here on the asphalt.

Steven:
Wayne, if ya remember those pines I collected in Spartanburg county off I-26 those were in red clay. Now from what I concluded as to their demise was I did not get enough of the roots/rootball. I found that I had to dig deeper than I thought I needed to to get to the roots. Some I dug down at least a foot before I uncovered any roots coming off the trunk/base. As far as how far to dig away from the trunk I was in the 14 to 20 inch range and I never came across any mass amount of feeder roots. All the pines were 4 feet or shorter in height with most trunks rangin from 4" to 2" thick. After they had died on me I pondered if I had the time over a couple of years to have just cut the roots with a tile spade while they were in the ground to get them to grow roots closer to the trunk. If ya have the time I would do exploratory digging. See how far down ya have to dig to hit any roots and then see how far away from the trunk ya have to go to find any good feeder roots.

My take on a pine with a 5" trunk, depending on the species, I'd give an estimate age of about 5-7 yrs. I give this estimate based on some pines where I work. I began workin there in June 2005. The area the pines are growin was bush-hogged back in August 2005. It has not been touched since. These pines are now on average 10 feet tall(except for the one that got snapped by a powerline truck a couple of yrs ago). They have trunk bases around 5" or so.

Hope this helps Wayne. Best of luck bud :)

bwaynef:
As it was starting to rain, I took these pictures.  They don't show the tree to best advantage, but I'll include an outline of the trunk.

I believe this to be P. virginiana.

John Kirby:
Wayne,
I guess I would ask- Why collect these trees? No taper, nothing really interesting about them, Personally, I would keep looking, find some that have been bush-hogged or trampled, etc. Check the rocky side hills over road cuts, etc. I have collected trees like this in the past, they all ended up in landscapes or on the burn pile when I realized what I had.

John

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