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Author Topic: Carving for smooth healing?  (Read 2693 times)
Sorce
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« on: August 17, 2013, 07:13 AM »

One, Does anyone use carving on a wound intended to callous over?

If so, do you switch bits to keep them cool, so they don't cook the live tissue?

And, Direction? Do you grind the tissue edge towards the wound or away from the wound?

Meaning, is the bit sweeping the edge in or out. 

Direction makes a huge difference, just wondering if anyone has mastered this.

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0soyoung
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« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2013, 12:30 PM »

I don't think it matters with 'slanting' a chop, but if your tool tends to tear the bark from the bole, go the other way so that the rotation of the bit is inward, toward the center of the cut or use a different bit. I use 'structured tooth' carbide bits in a Dremmel tool that make a fairly smooth cut. If I've erred and made a ragged edge, I finish by making a clean cut of the exposed cambium with a grafting knife. In the case of dieback of a branch, though, I try not to damage the branch collar other than incidental knicking of the inner ring. Again, accidents can and do happen and I just clean up the ragged edge with a grafting knife in the end.

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Sorce
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« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2013, 08:25 AM »

Thanks Oso.

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scottroxburgh
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« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2013, 05:32 AM »

I've only ever used hand tools, knob cutters, small chisels, and a grafting knife.

I too would be interested in what others use.
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Gaffer
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« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2014, 09:31 PM »

Gota use a Dremel. They have bits that cut very clean. When you recut the Claus make sure your first cut is lower and when you cut the callus keep it low to the callus. Does that make sense.
Good luck
Qualicum Brian
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Sorce
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« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2014, 06:52 AM »

I did get the Dremel corded 4000!  I think it makes sense, but a photo may be in order.

However, the cut is so much cleaner with the Dremel bit, its not so much of a concern as before, the other bit would push away more than cut.

I do love this tool. I hope to get the little detail attachment. 3 foot extension and small pencil size gun. Looks more ergonomic for long detail sessions.

Any useful bits?   I'm using the 1/4 in cylinder now.

Thanks Sorce


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Jay
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« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2014, 07:21 AM »

As for bits for the Dremel.... Dale Cochoy who is on this board from time to time is a vendor of bonsai specific bits for the Dremel.
These bits will take off a ton of material quickly, in the wrong hands too quickly but you will learn. If you are interested try shooting him off a PM.

As for me, when dealing with old wounds if all I'm trying to do is promote healing and closure of the wound I prefer hand tools. The Dremel I reserve for carving. But it could be I'm not good enough with the Dremel.

Jay
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Sorce
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« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2014, 08:00 AM »

Thanks Jay.

  Since this thread started, I have experimented with a razor pen and must agree, it would be much easier to use a grafting knife to clean up cuts.

This is of course, only because I can not yet invest in proper concave cutters.
I hope to get a Kaneshin round edge for spring! 
  Grin
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Chrisl
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« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2014, 10:02 AM »

I've been upgrading some of my 25+y/o tools with Kaneshin.  I've ordered SS wire cutters, new scissors, tweezer and a grafting knife.  These are really well made tools that I can highly recommend.  I first tried Ryuga's lg. wire cutters and was disappointed in performance.

Here's a good link about carving stubs:  http://bonsaijournal.com/beginners-trunk-chop-101.php
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jlushious
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WWW
« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2014, 10:32 AM »

Graham P. has a great video where he uses some power tools for a pretty awesome transformation
Bonsai Tree Demonstration - Power Carving a Nasty Stump


I can't remember if this one has been posted here before, but I remember it well and thought it worth watching (he also has a ton of other awesome videos).
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Jay
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« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2014, 11:53 AM »

A thought....
Look at Spherical Concave Cutters. The lade is somewhat rounded, it is 'almost' like a cross between concave cutters and knob cutters. I find them extremely helpful with cleanup cuts on large branches etc.
I would be interested in the thoughts on these by other members.

Jay
« Last Edit: January 18, 2014, 12:07 PM by Jay » Logged

Sorce
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Posts: 334
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« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2014, 05:58 PM »

I already watched all the Graham potter vids!   Grin

Hey Chris.

  Any $, or any other info about import taxes etc. Would be awesome. I'm a wee nervous about more $, I'm not prepared for. Rough duty estimate?  I. Really want to give their "excellent" customer service a go.

I hope to get those spherical cutters by spring!

Thanks all!
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Chrisl
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« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2014, 10:58 AM »

Sorce, here's the website:  http://kaneshin.shop.multilingualcart.com/index_en_jpy.html

I paid no taxes, import fees or anything.  I simply paid the price listed on the webpage.  Took delivery 2 wks later vis SMS shipping.

I've bought lg and small wire cutters, scissors, tweezers (drop forge), grafting knife and their sm. saw.  All SS.  The quality is very impressive!  (And yes John, I've changed my mind over to the dark side regarding grafting! hehehe)

Upgrading from black steel Koyo that I bought as a set in the 80's for less than $100 if I recall correctly.  Wow, prices have sure shot up 'just' over 34yrs LOL
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Sorce
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Posts: 334
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« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2014, 03:11 PM »

Awesome thanks Chris!

I just couldn't commit without knowing.

Can't wait to have clean cuts.
  Grin
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Sorce
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Posts: 334
USDA Hardiness: 6.3



« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2014, 06:35 AM »

Got word back from Kaneshin. Looks like I'll have some clean cuts soon!

Thanks again Chris, I'm way excited!

Concave (Branch) cutter Small Round Edge/ Weight 305g" No.4S    1 pcs   6 090 YEN
Tree Sealer " Cut-Paste" Large 500g (Total 764g including the package) No.155H 1 pcs   1 890 YEN
soil Grader with 3pcs mesh "Diameter 21cm,Weight 250g" No.145S   1 pcs   1 260 YEN

Weight 1319g

Shipping cost (SAL  ) : 3200yen

Total : 12440yen


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